Food

How to make arancini balls with tomato dip

Arancini rice balls with tomato dip

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Italian rice balls, called Arancini, are a classic of Sicilian cuisine. While the original is fried in oil, we rely on a healthy version of wholegrain rice baked in the oven. Arancini, together with a creamy tomato dip, are not only the perfect finger food at parties, but also make themselves outstanding in the lunchbox as a saturating lunch snack. Here is our step-by-step guide to make arancini balls with tomato dip.

Arancini balls with tomato dip: Ingredients

Rice balls

  • 1 cup risotto rice uncooked
  • 2 cups vegetable stock
  • 0.25 cup tomato puree
  • 2 tbsp Italian herbs
  • 3 tbsp yeast flakes
  • 1 tsp salt

Rice balls Panade

  • 1 cup wholemeal breadcrumbs
  • 1 tbsp yeast flakes
  • 1 tbsp chiunder dried
  • 1 tbsp parsley dried
  • 0.5 tsp salt
  • 1 pinch pepper
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper

Tomato dip

  • 1 cup tomato puree
  • 1 piece garlic clove
  • 1 tbsp cashews
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp Italian herbs
  • 1 tsp coconut blossom sugar
  • 1 pinch chilli powder

Arancini balls with tomato dip: Preparation

Rice balls

  1. Cook the risotto rice with the vegetable broth and tomato puree. In the meantime, you mix all the ingredients for the panade together.
  2. Allow the risotto rice to cool slightly and then add the Italian herbs, yeast flakes, salt and half of the panade. Afterwards, the rice must cool completely.
  3. Moisten your hands with a little water and then form evenly large balls of rice. Then roll the rice balls in the panade.
  4. Place the rice balls on a baking sheet covered with baking paper. Bake the rice balls at 180 degrees in the oven for about 25 minutes until crispy.

Tomato dip

Note: 1 cup equals 240ml, which is roughly a commercial tea/coffee cup. If you often make recipes with cup details or like to get creative yourself, we recommend American cups. Here, emphasis is placed on the proportionality of the ingredients as opposed to laborious weighing.

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